Artists

Friday Jibu

Born in 1974, Friday currently lives in Dedza in Mua, Malawi, an area renowned for its wood carving culture. Friday started carving wood at the young age of ten years. He is currently the fourth generation in his family to devote their lives to woodcarving: “I learned how to carve wood when I was ten years old back in Malawi” said Friday. “It is a skill I inherited from my father who taught us (me and my brothers) how to carve different type of wood”. In 2008, Friday travelled to South Africa for the first time to exhibit some of his work in Johannesburg. His present work includes life size carvings of both human and animal skulls in jacaranda wood. According to Friday: “To carve the wood I use a chisel and it takes me about two to three days to carve the smallest products. I work alone and mainly use two different types of wood: ebony which is brought down from Malawi, and jacaranda which is locally sourced. These two types of wood are strong and easier to carve. I then put varnish on some products to give them a shining colour and some I prefer not varnish on them this is to keep the natural colour of the wood.” Passionate about the art of carving, Friday also passes on his knowledge through classes at the Kungoni Centre of Culture and Art in Mua, Malawi. His unique ability, style and technique set him apart from the traditional rural woodcarver, to an artist who creates contemporary pieces of art.

Philipp Pieroth

German-born, Johannesburg-based visual artist Pieroth explores the idea of Paradise in his solo exhibition at In Toto Gallery. After a residency in Barbados, Pieroth dug a little deeper into the local history and found a sad and hellish history of slavery and misery. On the surface the island life is blissful with a population mostly of African descent. The native rhythms of the island give the illusion of a paradise while tourists are in denial about the truth of how the locals settled in Paradise. He believes that the west consumes places without fully understanding the history of a destination. Pieroth confronts this idea that traveling comes with a responsibility and humbleness, not only in the Caribbean but in South Africa as well. In his paintings he hopes to draw attention to the circumstances in which the locals came to settle in “Paradise" and create tension and disruption with his contextual discrepancy.

Tori Stowe

"I am a freelance artist, designer and illustrator working from a studio in our gallery, The Corner, based in the rural village of Bathurst, Eastern Cape, South Africa. As a fine artist, I work on themed collections of works to exhibit. The subject is usually drawn from the natural world: figures, animals and plants. I use mainly charcoal with ink and collage elements. Commissions and portraits are always on the go. As we create many of the products in our gallery my ouvre includes product design and development including the mediums of: fabric, stationery (digital graphic design), blackboards, ceramics and wood. I also design the logos and packaging of all we create. Our main production line is hand-printed fabric and I design all our ranges under the label Stowe and so. In addition to this I design exclusive ranges for other textile manufactuers, clothing companies and product wholesalers. Many of the products we sell are illustrated by myself, and I do freelance drawings for books, publications and magazines. I love to work!"

Sarel Petrus

Sarel Petrus lives and works in Pretoria and has exhibited in many group exhibitions across South-Africa in the last twelve years. He frequently travels to cities and to isolated places. In addition, he allows himself journeys of the mind into the strange relationship between traditional and throw-away-culture and what is left of nature as humans and other species fight for existence. City and town dwellers, largely cut off from natural continuity and natural spaces, are mostly unaware of what they leave behind wherever they go. But human existence and the natural environment are linked through timeless, hidden convergences of what we lack and what we have in surfeit. In his work, Sarel refers to an obscure past to imagine a new voice for the abstract realities of objects. Self inflicted pleasure, guilt, sacrifice, meditation of his own existence becomes apparent through art making. Steel letter punches are cast in bronze, which is too soft a metal to make them functional, but they are raised to an aesthetic element where the writing method and texture of writing becomes more important than what is actually written. The act of writing and the impermanence of the meaning of what is written, the head space for writing the experiences I feel need to be written down, the meditative function of recollecting and writing, the way instant memories escape the rules of language, how describing events too myself make them clear to me even though you were there, how reliant is your memory, how much does emotion affect memory, what do you choose to write down when you expect someone else is going to read it, how much of your own mind ramblings do you hope no-one ever reads, who do you confer with, who is the you in my writing, thinking internally and recalling externally. Memory is elusive, infused by emotion. No-one can present experience objectively or comprehensively, especially not to an unknown recipient. Not that one wants to let others read all the ramblings of one’s own mind, but how does one select? Finding a visual language to portray what is unfathomable is a solitary task. For me, hammering letter punches, one by one, consuming time, scarring physical surfaces of wood, wax or bronze with words is such a language. Intangible meaning made visible. Meaning remains vague. Each little bronze letter is a portrayal of an idea of a symbol by itself, igniting with meaning when read together. According to Sarel Petrus: My works are trophies for the lives of others, even though their stories are unknown to me. These unknown stories create spaces for us, to fill in our own stories and they thus become metaphors for our own memories and emotions. I select found objects for their visual impact and for the stories they don’t tell. Each object retains its own secret past. Our own end, death and decay might be predictable and unavoidable, but the paths we take and the distances we travel are clear.

John Moore

John Moore was introduced to the fauna and flora of Southern Africa at an early age. He remembers his veterinarian father coming home with different creatures, snakes, rabbits or pigeons. He and his twin brother often played with these creatures in early childhood. This instilled a love and appreciation for wildlife. John was schooled at St John’s College Johannesburg which allowed for long holidays and exploration of Southern Africa. His grandparents often took ‘the kids on safari” to the Kruger National Park. They where taught to love and appreciate wildlife in every form. They learned to enjoy not only the the wonder of the “Big Five” but also the complexity and detail of “the little things”. John remembers sitting at waterholes for hours armed with his binoculars and nature books. He studied birds, trees and insects. Over the years his appreciation for detail and micro organisms was firmly fixed into his growing imagination. He also learned to appreciate the different ecosystems that inhabit Southern Africa. His visited the contrasting coastal forests of Kwa-zulu Natal and the arid deserts of Namibia. Both beautiful and diverse. The abundance of wildlife, all living in fascinating surroundings, fired his imagination. He was able to witness and appreciate the indigenous people of Southern Africa. He had the opportunity to share and listen to tales of the fauna and flora around the fireside, which included their beliefs. At the end of his school career, John had to make a decision whether to go into “the Arts” or wildlife conservation. He decided on a career in Graphic design. He was accepted to the Graphic design course at Witwatersrand Technikon in 1991 where he changed to Fine Arts. He realized that he could now create the images of the creatures he admired. He merged his love of wildlife with his love for art. Due to his childhood experiences, John started to create detailed designs in his work. He enjoys the complexity of imagery as well as the opportunity to print multiple editions of his work. He very quickly realized that printmaking medium would be the form of art he wanted to create. Throughout his career, his work has become more and more detailed, large and complex. His chosen art forms include etchings, lithographs, woodblocks and Linocuts. He completed his H.Dip Diploma in printmaking. His work has evolved into more conceptual imagery and now has South Africa’s largest printing press in his studio. He is passionate about working on large-scale work creating immense detailed imagery on the works. John's material is gleaned from “experiencing life, in all its forms”.

Jodi Bieber

Jodi Bieber’s professional career began covering the 1994 Democratic Elections in South Africa for The Star Newspaper after attending three short courses at The Market Photography Workshop in Johannesburg. A turning point was her selection to partici- pate in the World Press Masterclass held in the Netherlands in 1996. This opened the door to travel the world on assignment for international magazines and NGO’s. She haswon numerous international awards including the Premier Award at World Press Photo in 2010. She continued during this time to persue her own projects and presently spends most of her time working this way. Her four monographs “Between Dogs and Wolves – Growing up with South Africa, 1996; Soweto, 2010; Real Beauty 2014 and Between Darkness and Light, Selected Works: South Africa 1994-2010 are exhibited in solo and group shows locally and abroad. Her photographs are housed in some significant col- lections like The Artur Walther Collection ,The François Pinault Collection,The Oppen- heimer Collection; The Johannesburg Art Gallery, Iziko Museums Collection; Jean Paul Blachere Foundation.

Pamela Chapman

I move through space and time, my thoughts directed and distracted as much by the demands of the day and memory as by considerations of the future. My art represents a filtering and ordering of these experiences, the structures I inhabit, the objects and images I absorb, along with the books I read and the people with whom I am involved: people who are also absorbed in their own languages, thoughts and environments. These paintings are imaginary, psychological and representational fusions of internal and external worlds and the movement between the two.

Nina Torr

Nina Torr was born in Johannesburg in 1987. Torr (formerly working under the pseudonym Andy Wyeth) is an artist/illustrator based in Pretoria. After attaining her BFA from the Parsons School of Design in New York in 2010, Torr returned to South Africa, where she is currently working as an artist and participating in exhibitions, as well as teaching illustration at the Open Window School of Visual Communication. Nina most recently participated in a group exhibition titled Joburg Joburg, at the Joburg Gallery (Johannesburg, March 2014). Selected group shows under the pseudonym Andy Wyeth include Home is Wherever I’m With You at Salon91, (Cape Town, December 2013), and Yay Bee Sea at Wolves (Johannesburg, August 2012). Nina has also held two solo shows as Andy Wyeth, namely Milk and Honey on the Other Side at Wolves (Johannesburg, June 2012) and An Unnatural History at the In Toto Gallery (Johannesburg, November 2012). Other venues where Nina has exhibited include the Kalashnikovv Gallery in Johannesburg with the Mega Bonanza Collective in Mega Bonanza Presents: Maybe You Just Have Bad Taste (July 2013), the CTICC Design Indaba (Cape Town, March 2012), and the Arnold and Sheila Aronson Gallery, in New York, USA during April 2010, which hosted On Site her BFA graduate group exhibition. Torr’s work explores subverted spaces inhabited by characters pursuing a journey of sorts. Her characters insinuate narratives that are suggested yet remain open-ended. The viewer as such becomes a participant in concluding these narratives by engaging with them on a personal level.

Kirsty May Hall

Kirsty May Hall was born in the 1970s in Benoni. She attained a Higher National Diploma in Fine Art from what was then Wits Technikon Fine Art Department in 1989, under the guidance of Dr Gregory Kerr, Marielda Marie and Leonora Faber. She then began studying nature conservation but left her studies to pursue wildlife rehabilitation. After working in Swaziland and Botswana bush for many years, hand rearing everything with fangs, fur and feathers, she returned to the urban life. Years of living among birds influenced Hall’s choice in subject matter, and soon everything in her world became about birds. “Birds have taught me everything I need to know about living a good and meaningful life” says Hall. Hall paints birds because hope comes on wings; because it takes courage to fly; because wild birds don't need passports. We are all in the birds that she paints, and they are us. They are hope, optimism, freedom, interaction. They are the reason to believe in better things. Birds transcend barriers of gender, culture, race, age and status. Birds teach us that we too are spectacular, because beauty can recognise itself in another. Hall’s palette and abundance within her compositions reflects nature’s lack of shyness with number and colour. Nature is independent of human ideals of aesthetics and doesn't care what is in vogue. Hall’s influences are nature San rock art, bird flight mapping and Fibonacci sequencing. The rock art influences are manifested in her placement of flat, graphic figures cut free from any unnecessary background. When the ancient spatial placement of forms is repeated on canvas, along with the combination of bird flight mapping data and Fibonacci sequencing, her work becomes a spacing of forms both part fantastical and scientific.

Sue Martin

Sue grew up in the 60’s in Natal. From an early age she was fascinated by the creative process and went on to study towards a Fine Arts Degree at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg. Sue enjoys experimenting with various media, including photography. Her constant, the use of oil pigments, often sits on the surface, hovering above the landscape. There is a sense of the figures being displaced from their surroundings. Sue Martin's work is essentially concerned with journeys both literal and figurative. it deals deeply with memories. The extensive use of gold in this series evokes a sense that wherever we go we take that which is most precious to us, particularly our thoughts and memories. Her work has a faded quality because, like memory, its is a resonance, a faint echo of things remembered. Her otherwise limited palette of earthy tones and figures set in timeless landscapes achieve a dreamlike quality. Her use of veils of colour metaphorically echo the many layers of meaning present in her work, as well as evoking layers of time.

James Delaney

He was born in Cape Town in 1971 and studied in Grahamstown and Cape Town, South Africa. James has held eight solo exhibitions and participated in many group shows, in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Philadelphia and New York. His work is in collections including Merrill Lynch Bank of America, the Constitutional Court of South Africa and the City of Johannesburg. He is well known for his fascination with downtown and historic Johannesburg, which features often in his work. He has a deep knowledge of the city’s architectural, political and artistic history. His interest in printmaking has led him to collaborations with various printmakers, including LL Editions, The Artist’s Press and Artist’s Proof Studio, and Robert Blackburn Print Workshop in New York. He works in New York each year. James Delaney is a contemporary artist working in print, charcoal, paint and sculpture from his studio at Victoria Yards, Johannesburg, South Africa. He is the winner of recent awards from BASA and the SA Institute of Architects. He has taken part in over 25 group and solo exhibitions in SA and the USA. This new series explores the history of New York City through his observations of architectural details and public artworks in different part of Manhattan. Lately he has been working with digital print processes, and a new series is emerging tracking doorways and historic buildings and the clues they present about the history of the city. These are full colour, larger format limited edition prints.

Joachim Schonfeldt

Joachim Schönfeldt was born in Pretoria, but his family moved to Namibia just three weeks later where he completed his schooling. After graduating from the University of the Witwatersrand in the early 1980s, he worked for Meneghelli Holdings as an advisor, curator and researcher in classic African art, and then decided to become a full-time artist in 1988. In 1989 he worked and lived in Italy before settling in Johannesburg the following year, writing criticism for a local daily, and curating, but mostly practising art. He also worked for short periods in Switzerland, Belgium and in NY. Schönfeldt has exhibited in New York, San Francisco and Massachusetts in the United States and in Vancouver in Canada. He has also exhibited in Paris, Berlin, Rotterdam, Lisbon, Porto, Glasgow, Turin, Umea, Davos, Sierre, Graz, Salzburg, and Copenhagen in Europe. He represented South Africa at the Venice Biennale and at the Sao Paulo Biennale and participated in both Johannesburg Biennales. In 2008 he participated in the Gwangju Biennale and in 2015 on All the Worlds Futures, Venice Biennale. He has worked with curators such as: Okwui Enwezor, Jean-Hubert Martin, Peter Weibel, Lauri Firstenberg (Independent curator in New York), Joao Fernandes (curator at the Seralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal), Julia Charlton (Wits Art Galleries) and Lioba Reddeker (Basis Wien). Articles on him and his work have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Flash Art, ArtAgenda, Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, Frieze, Atlantica, Modern Painters, The Financial Mail and Art Asia Monthly. In 2001 he was short-listed for the Daimler Chrysler Award. His work is represented in various private and public collections, including: Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), NY. The Smithsonian. Hangart-7-Sammlung. University of the Witwatersrand Art Gallery . Johannesburg Gallery. National Gallery, Cape Town.

Ilana Seati

Ilana Seati is an established South African contemporary painter who creates figurative and abstract works that explore concepts of truth and fantasy. She was born in Israel and moved to South Africa in the eighties, where she continued her studies at the Bill Ainsley Johannesburg Art Foundation. Ilana only started focusing on her art career and exhibiting regularly after 2000. Since then, she has steadily built up her name in the South African art market. She has worked with various galleries and has showcased many successful exhibitions, regularly selling out. In 2017 she showcased her work in a solo exhibition with In Toto Gallery at South Africa’s premier art event – the FNB JHB art fair. Her works have been bought by some of South Africa’s top art collectors, as well as international collectors and galleries in Europe and the US. Her works have been bought by top art collectors and in South Africa, Europe and the US Ilana paints mainly with oil and acrylic on canvas and is continually evolving her technique and style. She also works with various other media such as charcoal, inktense, and has produced sculpture and installation art.

Dorothy Clark

Dorothy Clark was born in 1951 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. She was raised in Zambia and schooled in Zimbabwe. Her schooling continued at Rhodes University in Grahamstown where she obtained a MA in Fine Arts, graduating in 1974. Dorothy’s oil on canvas works feature trees, plants, bushes, succulents, and landscape elements rendered in a way that speaks to the highly realistic, but enhanced with a painterly, expressive looseness of brush that allows her artistic personality to come through. The images represent, in some cases, what we would consider to be disasters in nature, but as Clark states, it is important to remember that in nature it is just an event. Nature compromises, recovers and moves on in a way that is far beyond humankind’s ability to do so. In fact, nature usually takes advantage of these events. Clark’s subject matter can be defined here as heroism in nature. Heroism in this context implies survival, or just plain perfection. “The design of the aloe is so perfect it has lasted 4 million years as far as we know,” says Clark. The admiration and respect that she has for these plants is echoed not only in the enormous scale she has chosen to represent them, but also in the fact that she remembers each individual plant painted here. Clark can recall the address of each plant, and it is represented as a unique individual, not a generic. Her beautiful images reflect Clark’s passion for nature, her abilities with a paintbrush and an unusual approach to the personalities of plants.

Luke Batha

Born in 1984, Johannesburg, South Africa. He is the son of iconic painter Gehard Batha, who studied in Vienna Austria Batha draws in pencil, charcoal, ballpoint and marker pen and paints washes on paper as well as oils and acrylic on large canvases (portraits, figures, landscapes, interiors and abstracts) Batha attended The Ridge School Westcliffe from 1989 until 1997, and received the art prize, under the tutelage of Jean Nel. He attended the Eden Art Academy in Johannesburg under Johan du Plessis a prominent SA artist and Stephan Erasmus, who is the ABSA collection curator. “From an early age I was privileged to have been taken to art museums and galleries in Europe and North America. I drew and painted for 20 years, developing my love of figurative Expressionism, favouring artists like Baselitz, Lupertz, Gerstl, Boeckel, De Kooning, Picasso and more. Of late I've been leaning toward abstract art that evokes a freer feeling, like music, my second passion. Painting is a compulsion of mine, battling with myself all the time. I never use black or colour straight from the tube. I am very particular about my palette mixing my own colours that blend and harmonise with each other creating a balanced composition of form, colour and light.” Batha has to date participated in 10 exhibitions, 2 of which were held at In Toto Gallery. Batha strives to achieve balance of form in his work, allowing his paintings to speak for themselves. The viewer is encouraged not to focus on the subject matter but rather the emotional brushstrokes that evoke the tradition of Expressionist painting. He is a particularly hard-working artist, choosing to remain private in his space and with his free time.

Louise Almon

Louise Almon has lived her life as an artist for the past four decades. She was trained at the art schools of Rhodes- and Cape Town University, where she graduated as a Bachelor of Arts in 1981. For the past two years Lou has lived in Kalk Bay, Cape Town. Working from her home studio, absorbing the colour and air of the ocean. Lou lived and worked in the Eastern Cape from 1980 - 2000 where she honed her skills in the company of George Pemba, whom she worked with intimately from the mid-eighties till the end of the nineties. Her experience as an artist was further enriched by becoming a founding member of the Imvaba Arts Association, a non-profit organisation that sought to promote black artists and make their work accessible to the art market. She has completed a two-month residency at the Cite International des Arts in Paris and produces artworks primarily in the form of multi-layered ink mono-prints and oil paintings. Her subject matter is taken from her immediate surroundings, whether it’s figures on the street outside her studio or a model whom she shares with her colleagues.

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Male Lion

Carved Jacaranda wood

13x37x24.5cm

2016

R15,500.00

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Horn Bill

Carved Jacaranda wood

17x33x22cm

2016

R14,000.00

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Baboon

Carved Jacaranda wood

10x22x14cm

2016

R11,000.00

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Gaugin Waiting

Mixed Media on Canvas

173x124cm

2018

R57,000.00

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Banana Boat

Mixed Media on Canvas

180x200cm

2018

R75,000.00

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Duck Face

Mixed Media on Canvas

150x90cm

2018

R50,000.00

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Pink Rescue

Mixed Media on Canvas

180x160cm

2018

R60,000.00

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In Safety

Mixed Media on Canvas

130x150cm

2018

R55,000.00

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3- Headed, 6- Legged Cow

Patinated Bronze, Lost wax method (Edition 3 of 5)

42.5x68x52cm

2014

R435,000.00

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3- Headed Cow (small version)

Bronze, Lost wax method (Edition of 35)

14x22x16.5cm

2015

R52,000.00

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Shrub Hare facing Right

Oil paint & Varnish on Hand- embossed Hahnemuehle Paper

53.5x39cm

2018

R35,000.00

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Goat facing Left

Oil paint & Varnish on Hand- embossed Hahnemuehle Paper

39x53.5cm

2018

R35,000.00

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Cockerel facing Right

Oil paint & Varnish on Hand- embossed Hahnemuehle Paper

53.5x39cm

2018

R35,000.00

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I Went Missing

Ink on Fabriano Paper

50x38cm

2016

R6,900.00

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Still Life with Hounds

Oil on Board

75x95cm

2012

R7,600.00

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Cloaked Bear

Ink on Fabriano Paper

21x15cm

2014

R3,500.00

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Lion and Cloud

Ink on Fabriano Paper

20x25cm

2013

R2,000.00

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Lion Holding Legs

Ink on Fabriano Paper

19x24cm

2013

R2,000.00

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Moving House

Collage on Paper with Ink and Charcoal

21x15cm

2018

SOLD

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Known Planet (Succulent Gardens) II

Collage on Paper with Ink and Charcoal

50x50cm

2018

R6,700.00

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Crab

Collage on Paper with Ink and Charcoal

21x15cm

2018

SOLD

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Trophy (Eland)

Collage on Paper with Ink and Charcoal

80x40cm

2018

R8,600.00

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Known Planet (Succulent Gardens) I

Collage on Paper with Ink and Charcoal

50x50cm

2018

R6,700.00

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Icosahedorn

Bronze

36x36x22cm

2017

R44,000.00

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Curve

Bronze 6/6

45x50x50cm

2016

R36,500.00

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I Forgot to be Playful

Bronze 5/15

21x40x30cm

2016

R31,000.00

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Sentinel 4

Bronze

57x24x16

2016

R28,000.00

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Departure

Bronze and Steel

200x45x45cm

2017

R43,000.00

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The Protector

Mixed media, Pastel, Charcoal, Silver pigment on Fabriano Paper

160x140cm

2018

SOLD

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Flight

Mixed media, Pastel, Charcoal, Silver pigment on Fabriano Paper

140x160cm

2018

R57,500.00

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Crow

Mixed media, Pastel, Charcoal, Silver pigment on Fabriano Paper

70x50cm

2018

R7,475.00

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Filter

Etching on Fabriano Paper

25x20cm

2018

R4,025.00

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Beast of Beauty

Mixed media, Pastel, Charcoal, Silver pigment on Fabriano Paper

140x160cm

2018

SOLD

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Roman Holiday I: Floating Man

Oil on Canvas

91x76cm

2018

R52,000.00

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Roman Holiday V: Shoot- Out

Oil on Linen

152x106.5cm

2018

SOLD

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A bevy of Clowns

Oil on Canvas

122x91cm

2017

R60,000.00

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Roman Holiday III: Long Hall

Oil on Linen

107x76cm

2018

R58,000.00

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Study for Roman Holiday IV: Red Room

Water colour on Paper

32.6x27.3cm

2017

SOLD

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Sunbirds and White Flowers

Acrylic on Canvas

95x90cm

2015

SOLD

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Bright Birds

Acrylic on Canvas

127x102cm

2015

SOLD

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Golden Weavers in a Coral Tree

Acrylic on Canvas

150x154cm

2015

SOLD

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Blue Swallos

Acrylic on Canvas

146x129cm

2015

SOLD

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Small Golden Weavers

Acrylic on Canvas

90x140cm

2015

SOLD

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Disembark

Oil pigment on Canvas

80x100cm

2016

R26,000.00

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Homeland

Oil pigment and Bees wax on Canvas

40x50cm

2016

R15,000.00

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The Lie of the Land I

Oil pigment on Mixed media on Canvas

84x64cm

2016

R20,000.00

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Morning Sky II

Oil pigment and Bees wax on Canvas board

100x70cm

2016

R35,000.00

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Morning Sky

Oil pigment and Bees wax on Canvas board

100x70cm

2016

R35,000.00

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Ghosts of Harrison Street (Rhino) Edition 2 of 8

Silkscreen on Fabriano Paper

70x100cm

2016

SOLD

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Central Park 1933/2016

Lithograph on Rives Paper

76x56cm

2016

R21,000.00

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Liberty in Paris and New York

Lithograph on Paper

56x76cm

2016

R21,000.00

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Ghosts of Fox Street (Elephants) edition of 8

Silkscreen on Fabriano Paper

70x100cm

2016

SOLD

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Doorways of Empire

Giclee Print on Tecco Matt paper

81x102cm

2018

R28,000.00

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Untitled 18/07

Mixed Media on Paper

60x75cm

2018

SOLD

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Untitled 18/03

Mixed Media on Paper

75x100cm

2018

SOLD

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Untitled 18/05

Mixed Media on Canvas

90x120cm

2018

R50,000.00

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Untitled 02/19

Mixed Media on Canvas

90x120cm

2019

R48,000.00

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Untitled 01/19

Mixed Media on Canvas

100x100cm

2019

R48,000.00

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Ginger Bush, Inanda

Oil on Canvas

180x131cm

2015

R40,000.00

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Alphen Boulder Cactus

Oil on Canvas

220x95cm

2019

R48,000.00

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Untitled 21

Mixed Media on Paper

100x70cm

2013

R9,600

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Untitled Nude

Oil on Canvas

48x70cm

2013

R8,000.00

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Gentleman

Acrylic on Canvas

122x91.5cm

2016

R23,000.00

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Waiting

Acrylic on Canvas

122x101cm

2016

R25,000.00

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Kalk Bay Cactus, Cape Town

Oil on Canvas

120x120cm

2018

R28,000.00

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Alphen Boulder Cactus, Cape Town

Oil on Canvas

120x120cm

2019

R28,000.00

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Prickly Pear Cactus, Greenside

Oil on Canvas

120x120cm

2018

SOLD

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Contemplation

Acrylic on canvas

152x122cm

2017

SOLD

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Untitled 1

Acrylic on canvas

122x91,5cm

2017

SOLD

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Smoke Break

Acrylic on canvas

122x101cm

2017

SOLD

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Untitled 1

Oil on Canvas

30 x 25cm

2013

R4,500.00

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Untitled 6

Oil on Canvas

30 x 25cm

2013

R4,500.00

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Untitled 3

Oil on Canvas

30 x 25cm

2013

R4,500.00